Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Doofus Of The Day #275


Today's title goes to whoever in Paterson, NJ thought it was a good idea for police officers, on foot, to lasso an escaping bull.

A 1,400-pound bull escaped from a northern New Jersey slaughterhouse and dragged officers with a lasso down a street before being captured and sedated.

The bull was being unloaded at ENA Meat Packing Inc. when it broke loose just before 8:30 am on Monday, said John DeCando, spokesman for Paterson Police's animal control division.

Police tried to catch the bull by lassoing a rope around the animal's neck, but it dragged officers down the street instead, The Record of Bergen County reported.

Luckily, traffic was light during the bull run, and officers finally corralled the animal after it ran 10 blocks. Mr DeCando was able to sedate the animal after it was cornered.


There's more at the link, including a splendid photograph of the bull and police.

Surely someone did the math? I mean . . . weight of angry bull: 1,400 pounds. Weight of three or four police officers, even those with severe donut-overdose problems? Perhaps 1,000 pounds in all. Result? Bull wins, every time!



Peter

7 comments:

reflectoscope said...

1400 pound bull? I'd start with twice its weight in strong dudes and see how that goes. Four? That is ridiculous!

Jim

Anonymous said...

I guess they don't have many cowboys left in Jersey. You need to snub the bull up using something that is fixed to the ground like a light pole or hydrant.

Did they read the bull his rights?

Arthur said...

At least they didn't shoot it.

It would be a shame to return a dead bull to the slaughterhouse. :P

Anonymous said...

Are they sure it wasn't a steer? Can they tell the difference?

MechAg94

Anonymous said...

A steer can be just as cantankerous as a bull.

Peter said...

Yes, a steer has less to be cantankerous with and more to be cantankerous about. It's a dangerous combination!

:-)

LabRat said...

When cowboys are roping a CALF in a rodeo, they're using the weight and strength of a full-grown horse to anchor the rope. What possesses people to try roping an adult bovine? Because this is far from the first such story I've heard.