Thursday, March 16, 2017

Another reason to stand back on the train station platform


The big storm that hit north-eastern states over the past weekend has had some unexpected consequences.  Commuters at Rhinecliff in New York were the victims of one of them.





Brrrrr!

Peter

15 comments:

TheOtherSean said...

Everybody and their brother is posting about or linking to this one today, because it is so awesome to watch. Nice selection!

Post Alley Crackpot said...

Not observed on the platform: much in the way of common sense.

See the snow on the rails? See the giant snow plough you think is just a train?

OH ME FIRST IN THE TAN KNIT HAT I WANT TO BE THE FIRST ON THE AMTRAK SNOW PLOUGH EXPRESS. :-)

Anonymous said...

You really do have to wonder...exactly what did Knit Hat et.al. think was going to happen when the engine hit that roughly-one-foot-deep drift all the way across the tracks and up to the platform edge? That is, assuming she/they were even thinking at all?

*slow head-shake*

Some folks really don't do themselves any favors, y'know?...

RobC said...

Love the way some of the folks quietly departed the scene... "Seen this shit before... I am getting out of Dodge!"

Rev. Paul said...

The Alaska Railroad engines have oversized plows on the front, sometimes referred to as "moose-catchers" in winter. Most here have learned to stay well back from the rails. Meanwhile, the iPhone crowd gets caught unaware. Every. Single. Time.

Murphy's Law said...

The smart ones were stepping back as the train approached. Every one of the rest appears to have been playing with their phones and not paying attention. This is just Darwin in the electronic age.

Dwan Seicheine said...

Looks like they are from the shallow end of the gene pool. What f***ing retards.

Anonymous said...

The woman in the knit hat, the woman in the red coat just in front of her, and the two men closest to this person taking this were all using their cell phones to record the train coming through. Nitwits didn't realize the amount of snow on the tracks that the train was going to push their way....Darwin at work...heheh.

B said...

What "victims"?

All I see is dumbasses getting what they deserve. Great video, but the smart ones moved back.

fast richard said...

I hope the pictures were worth it. I think everyone close to the track was trying to capture video. I'm not sure they realized how much power the wave of snow would have.

Roy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Roy said...

Well, the person who recorded the video we all watched got hit as well, and there was plenty of time to get out of the way before the wave of snow got that far down the platform.

I think the videographer probably thought it was worth the hit. After all, it's only snow. Just record as long as you can then turn your back and hunker down. Then you get to laugh at yourself after the train passes, and your video goes viral on the net.

Anonymous said...

In my youth me and my buddies used to stand next to the road after a big snow storm when the snow plow would come...intentionally caught in a wave of snow.
We loved it!

Anonymous said...

And no one there saw the snow on the columns and arches that support the roof?

"Gee, how did the snow get all the way up there?"

"Dunno, hang on I've gotta answer this"

Ignorance is not bliss.

Al_in_Ottawa

Will said...

What grabbed my attention was the speed of the train entering the station. THAT doesn't look normal. I'm guessing that they don't want to try to creep through that much mass using just their wheel traction.

I see that the report mentions the train overshot the stop. I would expect that, as they would want to clear the tracks a bit, to give themselves a running start before they would hit any snow pack.

I suspect that normal snow plowing of the tracks usually keeps them clear enough that the passengers would not normally encounter this sort of situation.