Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The ugliest buildings in the world


The Telegraph has a photo essay titled 'The world's 30 ugliest buildings'.  I'm not sure that some of them aren't actually attractive, in a strange - or at least 'different' - sort of way, but there are certainly some eyesores among them!  Here are a few examples.



The ArcelorMittal Orbit sculpture and observation tower at the London 2012 Olympic Park



The Mirador Building in Madrid, Spain



Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia



The National Library in Pristina, Kosovo


There are many more at the link.  Worthwhile viewing, if only to ask yourself what on earth the architects and designers were smoking!




Peter

3 comments:

Eric Wilner said...

The Aldar headquarters building puts me in mind of a giant magnifying glass, as seen in The Tick episode "Ants in Pants!", or possibly Calvin and Hobbes.
That Barclays Center has the permanently-under-construction look, which I suppose was intentional...?
And I was wondering whether they'd include the huge virus that is the main library at UCSD! Looks like they've added some sort of trench or wall around it since I was there.
(Also, once upon a time, there was a church visible from the freeway, south of San Francisco if memory serves, that was commonly known as the Giant Washing Machine Agitator. No idea if it's still there. Not quite as WTF as the collection.)
Indeed, that collection includes quite a variety of WTF. Might lead one to wonder what those who paid for it were thinking... but most of those were funded with Other People's Money, so any folly is perfectly fine, right?

Francis W. Porretto said...

Looking at that building in Kosovo, all I could think was "I hope someone is working on a cure!"

Coconut said...

On the one hand, they're fantastic triumphs of architecture and modern construction.

On the other, the North Korean and Beijing ones tell you exactly what their governments do to people.

On the gripping hand, it'd probably have been better if the designers had been restricted to brick and mortar.