Friday, January 4, 2013

How not to demonstrate electrostatic discharge


Uh . . . yeah.  Right.







Peter

14 comments:

Capt. Schmoe said...

Some of us are trainable, others....

Funniest video that I have seen in a long while. Thanks for the post.

Anonymous said...

Saw those coming a mile away.
at least it was NOT 25kv at 30 amps.
That would have been fun to watch the first time he did it to himself.
that would have made his putter stiff for a LONG while.

Will said...

Twenty some years ago, I was building and testing a 60w flowing gas Co2 CW surgical laser. The cavity mirror mounts on the ends of the laser tube were "live", 22kv. Don't recall the amps, but significant. Had to keep one arm behind my back while adjusting the beam mode, to avoid touching anything, as a cross body current could stop your heart. Used an insulated "L" Allen wrench. Got tossed across the lab a couple times. After getting zapped, making fine adjustments that day wasn't possible. Usually had to go take a long break, until the jitters/twitches stopped.

Carteach said...

I cannot count the number of times I have been hit with high voltage in my life. Hell, with older style ignition systems, us 'manly' techs would just lick our fingers and run them down the cable to kind the Kv leaks.

Still.... this was funny. Real funny.

Old NFO said...

LOL, that boy just NEVER will learn... :-D

Anonymous said...

Our engineers will love this one!

Thanks.

Gerry

perlhaqr said...

Hahahahahahah, hilarious. Presumably intentional, but still funny.

Man, that ESD gun looked like half of a spot welder.

Dave O. said...

I'm a little ashamed of myself for enjoying that video. Still did, tho.

Graybeard said...

Like perlhaqr said, that had to be intentional.

I hope.

Borepatch said...

Holy cow, that's funny.

Shrimp said...

Is it wrong that I laughed? I saw each and every one of those coming, and I think he's either the dullest knife in the drawer, or very astute and went to great lengths to prove his point.

Either way, it brought me back to my assembly-line days, with the ground wire and why we had to wear it when we assembled component boards.

Glenn B said...

Those zaps did not hurt him as much as the one that hurt me when I climbed up on the bumper of a Chey Blazer, while the engine was running, and attempted to see if the coil wire was properly attached to the coil. I flew off of the bumper onto the blacktop of the parking lot. I had an aching wrist and figured I hadsprained it on landing but when I looked at it, I saw a small perfectly round sore (burn) there. A few minutes later, I realized my ankle was also hurting much like my wrist, the same type of burn hole was on my ankle too. I promised myself never again to become a ground wire by way of being a knucklehead. That zap has proven itself as an effective learning tool to date as I got zapped back sometime between 1980-82 and have not repeated it.

Sort of wish I had a video of me getting zapped, it would be sure to go viral.

All the best,
GB

trailbee said...

Some of us will go through anything just to get 1:25 mins. of fame. :) Thank you.

Will said...

Carteach:

back in the early 70's, I worked at a shop that the old guy checked ignition systems something like that. He would run his hand over the wires, pull them off, etc, and then tell me what component was bad. Built his own engines for Indy cars, in the 40-50's era. Wish he hadn't been so cranky, I would have liked to talk engineering with him. He quit building racers when the car broke an axle and tossed a wheel into the stands, killing some spectators.